Roman Klinger bio photo

Roman Klinger

Natural Language Processor and Machine Learner

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About me and my research

I am a senior lecturer ("Akademischer Rat") at the Institute for Natural Language Processing (IMS) at the University of Stuttgart. Before, I have been a visiting professor at IMS (substituting Sebastian Padó) and a research associate in the semantic computing group headed by Philipp Cimiano at the University of Bielefeld, being affiliated with the Research Institute for Cognition and Robotic (CoR-Lab) and the Center of Excellence Cognitive Interaction Technology. I am a co-founder of the Semalytix GmbH.

My main research goals are to use text mining and natural language technology to structure different kinds of text. Tasks include fine-grained sentiment analysis, emotion analysis, biomedical natural language processing, or web mining.

My former affiliation was the Fraunhofer Institute for Algorithms and Scientific Computing, which became well known in the 1980s as the GMD institute at which the SUPRENUM project was developed and Carl Adam Petri worked on his Petri-Nets. I contributed to the bio-medical and chemical information extraction projects in the Bioinformatics department, headed by Martin Hofmann-Apitius. We developed named entity recognition and relation extraction systems for chemical and bio-medical entity classes, based on machine learning approaches.
During this time, I also lead the task of data analysis in the e-participation project +Spaces, where we developed methods based on sentiment analysis and topic modelling to support policy makers in accessing the content of political debates in social spaces like Facebook, Twitter, Blogger and others.
I did my PhD in the context of conditional random fields for text mining, especially for named entity recognition with a focus on optimization and representation aspects. My supervisors were Prof. Dr. Günter Rudolph at the University of Technology Dortmund and Prof. Dr. Martin Hofmann-Apitius at the University of Bonn. In 2010 and in 2013, I visited the information extraction and synthesis laboratory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, headed by Prof. Andrew McCallum.
My Erdös number is 3, due to a publication with W. John Wilbur (on which I am one of 34 authors ;-)). My Bacon number is infinity, as far as I now.